Place and mission from an African immigrant perspective

By Harvey Kwiyani and Alan Roxburgh    In this interview, Alan Roxburgh introduces Harvey Kwiyani, a scholar and an African immigrant to the UK, now based at Liverpool Hope University. Harvey comes from Malawi, and left in 2000 at a time of revival.  When he first came to the west he found himself in Switzerland where…

Mission-Shaped Church in a Multicultural World

 Well, my contribution to the Grove Booklet Series entitled “Mission-Shaped Church in a Multicultural World” is out now. It joins many other resources that are available on the market exploring how we as sons and daughters of God can live together in the kingdom. Often, we tend to hang out with people that are…

African Church Planting in Europe: State of the Conversation

For four times in the past two years, I have taught a term-long Church Planting module at two colleges in England. The students taking this module have been exclusively African—from many countries, denominations, networks, and movements across the continent. The question that shapes the module—and the conversations thereof—has always been “how can African Christians plant…

A Calf is Born with Ears

Two weeks ago — on the 26th of June 2015 — we had the main Missio Africanus Conference of the year at the Church Mission Society’s CMS House in Oxford. It was a great day with excellent attendance and brilliant conversations on emerging theological themes in African Christianity (both in Africa and in the Diaspora)….

Would you like to know us theologically?—John Mbiti

Theologians from the new (or younger) churches have made their pilgrimage to the theological learning of older churches. We had no alternative. We have eaten theology with you. We have drunk theology with you. We have dreamed theology with you. But it has all been, in a sense, your theology. We know you theologically. The…

Missio Africanus: The Start of a Conversation

On the 27th of June 2014, some 75 Christian leaders from different parts of the UK met at the legendary Crowther Hall in Selly Oak, Birmingham, for seminar called Missio Africanus.[1] A third of the gathering were (white) British pastors and leaders of missions organisations, and the remaining two thirds were Africans from different denominations…

Incarnational Theology and Intercultural Mutuality

In a Masters class that I taught recently, one of the students asked me a question that I found tricky: “can missional incarnation happen upwards?” Knowing the student, it was clear to me that I was faced with a good trap. On the one hand, I would have to process this question in the light…

Self-theologising In The Diasopra

Liberating Theology: Can Africans Self-theologise in the Diaspora? In the mid–1800’s, two missionary leaders, Henry Venn and Rufus Anderson, suggested that the new churches that came out of the Western missionaries’ work in Africa and other places needed to be self-governing, self-propagating, and self-supporting in order to be considered mature enough to be left on…

Mission Is The Telos Of Theology

Mission: The Telos of Theology I have just had the privilege to re-read Martin Kähler’s “Schriften zu Christologie und Mission” (of course, auf Deutsch) and among many issues that he discusses, I really like his suggestion that mission is the mother of theology. To say that theology “comes out of mission” makes perfect sense to…

Getting Beyond the Clash of Christianities

The arrival of world Christianity in the second half of the twentieth century has implications that we are yet to begin to comprehend. To borrow the language of Samuel Huntington who talks about the clash of civilizations, my long engagement (as an African) with Western Christianity in Europe and North America has led me to…